Route 29 Revue

I.M.P. and All Good Present

Route 29 Revue

Trampled by Turtles, Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue, Iron and Wine, The Devil Makes Three, Guster, Hurray For The Riff Raff

Sat, September 13, 2014

Doors: 1:30 pm / Show: 2:30 pm

Merriweather Post Pavilion

Columbia, Maryland

$40.00 - $55.00

This event is all ages

Ticket Limit - There is an 8 ticket limit; per household, customer, credit card number, phone number or email address for this show. Patrons who exceed the ticket limit will have their order cancelled automatically and without notice.

Trampled by Turtles
Trampled by Turtles
On Wild Animals, Trampled by Turtles’ seventh studio album, themes of impermanence run deep, both lyrically and sonically. The quintet’s hybrid folk sound continues its evolution pushing the band further into the grey area between genres that defies pigeonholing.

Trampled By Turtles formed in 2003 in Duluth, Minnesota. From their beginnings on the Midwestern festival circuit, they have reached new heights with each album. The release of 2012’s Stars And Satellites saw the band play to more fans than ever, sell close to 100,000 albums, make their first national television appearance on The Late Show With David Letterman, and have their first concert feature, Live at First Avenue, broadcast on Palladia. This year will see the band headline Red Rocks Ampitheatre for the first time and the kickoff of their own festival, Festival Palomino, which will take place September 20, 2014 outside Minneapolis.

Lead songwriter Dave Simonett has been especially affected by change over the last few years. He relocated from Duluth to the city of Minneapolis. “When I lived in Duluth, I think I took connection with uncivilized nature for granted. There, I had to drive 20 minutes and I was in the middle of nowhere, and I did this almost daily,” says Simonett. “This was a very important ritual for me. Solitary time in a nearly untouched landscape is my version of church, so I think there is a bit of loss of religion in a lot of my work these days. I've always been a little obsessed with our struggle to stay connected to our simple animal side, the part of our nature that lived off the earth, hunted live game, worshipped trees and mountains. I believe a lot of sadness is caused by feeling disconnected with the rest of nature. A lot of what is instinctual for us is beaten down and frowned upon in modern society. It has to be confusing for the subconscious.”

Wild Animals found Trampled by Turtles working with a producer for the first time in four studio records. The band placed themselves in the capable hands of longtime Duluth, MN compatriot Alan Sparhawk of the band Low and engineer B.J. Burton (Poliça, Megafaun, Volcano Choir) who crafted a sonic landscape that was spatial and new at Cannon Falls, MN’s Pachyderm Studio (Nirvana, The Jayhawks).



Says Simonett on working with Sparhawk: “Alan is one of the most musically courageous people I know and that’s exactly the attitude we were looking for. He’s great at taking a song from its false conclusion all the way down to its very core and then building it back in new and interesting ways.”

And on Burton’s contributions: “He has an exciting way of looking at sound. He shares Alan’s courage in music in that he’s ready to take organic sounds and push them to new places. He’s extremely technically skilled but not tied to any recording dogma.”

The band’s signature harmonies are intact, although the contributions that Sparhawk and Burton added created a new depth. Tim Saxhaug, the band member who has traditionally done much of the vocal arrangement says, “The production team pushed the band to consider new ways of approaching harmony, and the result 'opened our ears.' I wasn’t sure that recording could feel new after six studio albums, but that went away on the first day. Making this album was the most creative I’ve ever felt in my life.”

When asked about themes in his writing, Simonett says, “I’ve always felt they’re just various ways humans have attempted to explain the unexplainable. To keep the fear of the darkness that waits for all of us at bay. The death of a loved one, the parting of friends, the changing leaves, the loss of love. All the little parts that come and go. In a way it’s refreshing because the knowledge that nothing will ever stay the same offers innumerable opportunities for rebirth. “

Sparhawk adds about the band’s relationship, “The sound that caught my ear was there from the beginning and stands to this day: I call it the 'wall of strings.' Taking instruments we have heard for generations, the Turtles dive in with post-punk energy and selflessness. Everyone has a part in the arrangement that leans on and enhances the others, always serving the song. The message is not about individuals - it's about what can be done when people get together, apply their heart and soul, and make a little room for each other. Music has always had that potential, but it's rare when it actually happens.”

Erik Berry says of the band's chemistry, "From the earliest times we started playing, there has always been a real hard-to-define quality about our chemistry, something special. It’s been a treat to find that more than ten years in we still can turn new corners, at least new-to-us corners, together in the way we approach a song or a sound and still with that quality. That something that makes us, us."





Wild Animals is the sound of a band at the peak of their potential, strengthened from a decade together, winning some and losing some, but growing none-the-less. The album captures the intense nature that goes with being alive, melding the universal and the personal.
Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue
Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue


Troy 'Trombone Shorty' Andrews has God-given talent, natural charisma and a relentless drive to bridge music's past and future. His third outing for Verve Records, Say That To Say This (Sept. 10), co-produced by Andrews and kindred spirit Raphael Saadiq, sounds like nothing else out there, as Andrews and his longtime band, Orleans Avenue - guitarist Pete Murano, bassist Mike Ballard and drummer Joey Peebles - continue their natural musical evolution. In a very real sense, the torch is passed from one great New Orleans band to another on the new album, which features the first new studio recording from the original members of the legendary Meters in 36 years, as they revisit their 1977 classic "Be My Lady," with Andrews singing lead and playing horns.

The bandleader and multi-instrumentalist describes Say That To Say This as "really funky, like James Brown mixed with The Meters and Neville Brothers, with what I do on top, and we have a bit of R&B from Raphael's side. All the guys in my band are big, big fans of his, so this is a real dream come true for us. And he's a fan of New Orleans brass band music, which I didn't know beforehand. Just listening to his music and the direction he's going in now, I thought that he would be perfect to work with us. What drew me to him was his knowledge of what came before and his imagination of where the music can move forward to. That's the same way I think, so it worked out very well."

Saadiq doesn't just co-produce, he becomes a member of the band, playing a variety of instruments and contributing backing vocals; he also had a hand in writing three songs. Says Andrews of Saadiq: "He's a great producer, but he's also a musician, so he was able to get in there, jam with us and take us to some different places. And we were able to take him to some different places too."

"We felt a certain amount of pressure, because we knew we were working with one of the great young producers and musicians," Andrews acknowledges. "But it was good pressure, and Raphael being in the room with us inspired us to step up as writers and players. We spent an initial two or three weeks in the studio in L.A. working out the tracks, and I think having that stretch of uninterrupted time really played a big part in how creative we were able to get. On the last two records we were so busy touring that we would go in for three or four days and then go out for a week, so we had to switch on and off between the stage mentality and being creative in the studio. So this time, knowing we were gonna be in the studio for two or three weeks straight, we reached down deep and were able to do some things that we wouldn't have come up with if we'd been on a tight schedule. It allowed us to be very free."

The first track laid down for the album, the pumping "Long Weekend," came together in a flash during Andrews' initial foray to L.A. to hang with Saadiq. "I went out there to see how we would jell," Troy recalls. "I met him and his band in the studio and they came up with that song for me, right in front of my face, and it was really fun to just sit back and watch it go down. It didn't take that long - they were killin' it. I put the horn parts on that same day. That track has a lot of energy; I love the way it feels."

The next step was to see how Saadiq would jell with Trombone Shorty & Orleans Avenue. "The one where we really clicked for the first time was 'Get the Picture,'" Andrews says of this burner, which has Saadiq's fingerprints all over it, trading guitar licks with Murano and playing clavinet. "After that, he sat back and watched us work, and every once in a while he'd come in and make a suggestion," says Andrews of the recording sessions. "So he basically let us do what we do and fine-tuned it if it needed it, and if it didn't he just kept it the way we had it. And that was very inspiring, because if he thought it was cool, then we felt like we'd done what we needed to do on our end."

The opening title track emphatically sets the vibe, as Murano unleashes a barrage of power chords over a pummeling groove from Peebles and Ballard - but a blast of brass from Trombone Shorty instantly alters the feel, bringing a more elegant form of aggressiveness to the proceedings. The mood then shifts again to a deeply soulful section in the manner of Earth, Wind & Fire, before powering back into rocking mode. "That track is just a timeline of who we are and how we think," says Andrews.

"For most of the album," he continues, "we wanted to get it as tight as we could performing it in the studio, so we'd just play the song straight through, but we couldn't do that with 'Shortyville,' which was just myself and Raphael. I started that track by hitting a bass drum with a mallet, like you would in a New Orleans brass band; then I played a full drum set on top of it. We built it up from there part by part, with me doing the horns and Raphael playing the bass and guitar."

Of "Fire & Brimstone," the lead single, Andrews notes, "The beat I was hearing was an old-school hip-hop thing. I can't remember what we were listening to when we came up with the idea, it might've been something by Dr. Dre, Easy E or Run-D.M.C., but when I heard it, I said, 'Joey, let's do a beat like that underneath the track so I can do some intricate things on top.' That's what we did, and it came out with this swampy, voodoo feel."

As for the impromptu Meters reunion, Andrews was listening to the band's eighth and final album, 1977's New Directions, one day, and as the smoothly soulful "Be My Lady" wafted out of the car speakers, it hit him that the track's mellow, romantic vibe ("laid-back in the cut," as he puts it) was exactly what his album in progress needed. But rather than simply covering it, Andrews got it in his head that he had to record it with The Meters themselves. When he told friends of his plan, they told him he was dreaming. Since breaking up soon after releasing New Directions, the four original members had performed together a mere handful of times, and only on stage for special occasions, never in the studio. What's more, there was no manager to contact; Andrews had to call each one and ask if he'd be up for going in the studio with his former bandmates.

"With all four of them, when I asked the question, there was a second of silence," Troy recounts with a laugh. "But then, each one of them said, 'If you talk to the rest of the guys and they're up for it, then I'll do the track. And even if you can't get everybody together, I would still love to play on it. So I was able to get all of them to agree, and then I had to call all of them back to tell them it was on. So they all came to the studio, including Cyril Neville, who sang the original vocal; he does the background vocal and the ad-libbing on the new track. At the end of one of the takes, they started jamming, and you could see a sparkle in all of their eyes at the magic they could make together. Whatever their differences, whatever reasons they don't work together, it went out the window for those few minutes, and I got a chance to experience what it used to be like when The Meters made all those classic records. I had the chills while it was going on."

"After we were done," Andrews continues, "George Porter pulled me aside and said, 'Thank you. You have gotten us to do something that people have been trying to get us to do for 35 years,' and I was speechless. Because The Meters helped to create a sound that gave me a foundation for doing what I do. It was one of those magical moments in life for me, because in New Orleans, The Meters are like the Beatles."

The title, Andrews explains, is a common New Orleans expression that essentially means "To make a long story short," serving as a wonderfully on-point description of the album and of Trombone Shorty's music in general. "This record is a direct expression of everything we hear, everything we've seen and everything we've been through musically," Andrews assets. "We're just making a long story short."

Saadiq is equally thrilled with the results of this musical summit meeting of young giants. "If you're a producer or musician, you want to work with other great musicians," he says, "because it only betters you, I was just honored to be a part of the project."

Andrews' previous projects include 2010's Grammy-nominated Backatown and his sophomore effort, For True (2011), which spent 12 weeks atop Billboard's Contemporary Jazz Chart. In the past few years alone, Andrews has appeared on recent recordings by an eclectic assortment of artists ranging from Zac Brown to Eric Clapton to Rod Stewart and Cee Lo Green, while taking the time to initiate a mentoring program at Tulane University via his Trombone Shorty Foundation. He's also been featured on the covers of Downbeat and Jazziz magazines, as well as on Conan, The Tonight Show, Jimmy Kimmel Live, Late Night With Jimmy Fallon, Austin City Limits and in a recurring role on the hit HBO series Treme. The band was also chosen to play the closing set at the 2013 New Orleans Jazz & Heritage Festival, a huge honor in the world of true music lovers.

But for Andrews, the biggest thrill of all was performing at The White House in February 2012. "That was a dream come true about 50 times over," he says. "When we started playing, I forgot I was at the White House because I was on stage with all this musical royalty - B.B. King, Mick Jagger, Booker T. Jones, Jeff Beck, Susan Tedeschi and Derek Trucks, Gary Clark Jr., the list goes on. And then, when I turned to the audience, there's the President and the First Lady. I'm like, 'This can't be happening.'"

Good things continue to happen for Trombone Shorty, thanks to his virtuosity, his dedication, and his ability to move people. That he pursues his passion with such humility and unpretentiousness makes his still-unfolding story as compelling as the music he's making along the way.
Iron and Wine
Iron and Wine
Iron and Wine makes its Nonesuch Records debut with Ghost on Ghost in the US on April 16, 2013 (April 15 on 4AD in Europe, Japan, Australia and New Zealand). Ghost on Ghost is the fifth release from singer-songwriter Sam Beam, using the pen name Iron and Wine. The album was produced by Beam’s longtime associate Brian Deck (Modest Mouse, Califone, Fruit Bats) and follows 2011’s Kiss Each Other Clean, which debuted at #2 on the Billboard chart to critical acclaim. Iron and Wine will support the new release with tour dates throughout 2013, to be announced soon. A special pre-order at ironandwine.com also will be announced soon.

Rolling Stone said of Kiss Each Other Clean that “pop music hadn’t seen anything like it since the heyday of Cat Stevens,” while Pitchfork said it “more closely resembles the lush, gold-toned singer songwriter records of the late 60s and early 70s—Astral Weeks, Goodbye Yellow Brick Road.”

For Ghost on Ghost, Beam sought to move from what he called the “anxious tension” of his two previous records. “This record felt like a reward to myself after the way I went about making the last few,” he says.

Helping achieve Beam’s vision was a group of stellar musicians including Rob Burger, Steve Bernstein, Brian Blade, Curtis Fowlkes, Tony Garnier, Marika Hughes, Briggan Kraus, Maxim Moston, Tony Scherr, Doug Wieselman, Kenny Wolleson, and Anja Wood. Burger (Tin Hat Trio) has worked with Beam intermittently through the years and handled arrangements for strings and horns on Ghost on Ghost. For the album’s cover, Beam, who is also a visual artist, chose an image from the series “Private Views” by noted photographer Barbara Crane.

The first three Iron and Wine albums, released on Sub Pop, were The Creek Drank the Cradle (2002), Our Endless Numbered Days (2004), and The Shepherd’s Dog (2007).
The Devil Makes Three
The Devil Makes Three
THE DEVIL MAKES THREE

If a love child between Reverend Gary Davis and the Ramones blessed this earth she’d be sweating, stomping and singing with the rest of us in the front row at a Devil Makes Three concert. The energy draws us in, the music and storytelling keep us there.

Sourcing country blues, punk and folk, throwing in fierce finger-picking guitar, a little slide, power tenor banjo and rocking upright bass, Pete Bernhard, Lucia Turino and Cooper McBean create a multispanned bridge between musical styles. Their vocal harmonies wind tightly around original songs and breathe life into favorite covers. It all pours forth from a timeless pulse that pulls you to the past, flies you to the future and lands you on the dance floor.

“We like shows where people can dance,” says Bernhard, “and it isn’t about how great the musicianship is as much as the energy of the crowd and the songs themselves. I listened to a lot of old blues and country and singer-songwriter stuff because that’s what it was all about. Townes Van Zandt, Woody Guthrie, Lead Belly –– great storytellers, straightforward storytellers.”

The three band members are from Vermont, where Bernhard and McBean played in a few rock and punk bands but found their most exciting common ground in acoustic music.

“My parents and brother were musicians and they introduced me to acoustic stuff, especially fingerpicking blues,” says Bernhard. “I liked electric blues, and acoustic blues and country by Robert Johnson, Woody Guthrie, Bob Dylan.”

When Bernhard and McBean caught up with Turino in Santa Cruz, CA, she learned bass and the band was born.

Since releasing their first album in 2002, The Devil Makes Three has played nationwide to raving, capacity crowds whose enthusiastic support has guaranteed the band a sizable and loyal following. They will tour extensively over the coming months, and are working up material for their fourth studio album; a new live recording will be released this fall via Milan Records.
Guster
Guster


“I told Swift that our last two records took a year each to make,” laughs Guster’s Ryan Miller. “He told me he’d never spent more than nine days on an album.” The band and producer got together anyway and the result is Evermotion, an album of raw acid-soaked chamber pop, and a stylistic departure that no one saw coming.

Guster sought out Shins keyboardist/Black Keys bassist Richard Swift based on his work with Damien Jurado and Foxygen, giving themselves over to the full experience of recording at Swift’s Cottage Grove, Oregon studio for three weeks in January 2014.

“It wasn’t hard to figure out where we overlapped with Swift,” adds percussionist/drummer Brian Rosenworcel. “It was just a matter of trusting ourselves to go big and commit. Richard is the type of artist that’s always standing back and taking in the whole canvas.”

With a new looseness and swagger, Guster pushes the acoustic guitars into the background, instead exploring deeper drum grooves, keyboard textures and atmospheric noise -- a language they shared easily with Swift. The band that emerged from this session sounds like one that is no longer evolving, but has evolved into something else entirely.

"Richard helped us figure out what was important about recording," says guitarist Adam Gardner. "We had just one microphone over the drum kit, used whole takes, didn't obsess over vocals or really edit things at all -- it's a raw version of our band, mistakes and all, that feels more relevant. He helped us tremendously with the big picture."

Evermotion’s first single, the infectious “Simple Machine,” has been hailed by TIME magazine for its “frantic beats and crawling synthesizers.” The chiming lullaby of “Long Night” with its aching Ryan Miller falsetto, the shimmering “Endlessly,” the distorted steel drums and Bacharach melody of “Doin’ It by Myself,” the a cappella Beach Boys harmonies in the gently breezy “Lazy Love,” the dream-pop of “Expectation,” the British Invasion beat of “Gangway,” the woozy trombones and whistling of “Never Coming Down” and the Beatle-esque psychedelia of “It Is Just What It Is” shows Guster is still learning new tricks.

Since forming at Tufts University in 1992, Guster has become one of the leading indie/alternative bands, releasing seven critically acclaimed albums in 20 years, starting with Parachute in 1995. Evermotion (to be released on their own Ocho Mule label through Nettwerk Records) is the follow-up to 2010’s Easy Wonderful, which earned the band its highest-ever chart debut on the Billboard 200 at #22, while reaching #2 on both the SoundScan Alternative and iTunes charts.

On Evermotion, Guster’s acoustic roots are buried deep beneath the surface, almost impossible to detect, even though every song has, at its heart, an indelible melody and more than its share of tight, lethal hooks that catch and hold.

The 2010 addition of multi-instrumentalist Luke Reynolds to the core group of founding members Miller, Gardner and Rosenworcel, added immeasurably to Guster’s expanding musical palette. Evermotion marks the first time that Reynolds joined for the preproduction and writing process, which took place in Rosenworcel's Brooklyn basement over 2012 and 2013. Reynolds' stamp is clear and his passion is all over the record, from his guitar melodies on "Lazy Love" to his fuzz bass on "Doin' It By Myself."

Guster’s songs remain packed with hummable choruses and dense lyrical detail amid the muscular guitar riffs, clanging percussion and deceptively dark lyrics. The new album features adventurous turns on slide guitars, brassy trumpets and even a glockenspiel, with sax and trombone accompaniment by Jon Natchez, whose stints with the War on Drugs, Beirut, Passion Pit and others have led NPR to call him “indie rock’s most valuable sideman.”

From the start of the album, it's clear that this is a renewed band with a bolstered purpose, a band on their own vector. Evermotion introduces you to a Guster that is free, not calculated, seasoned but loose, confident in re-shaping their legacy.
Hurray For The Riff Raff
Hurray For The Riff Raff
Hurray For The Riff Raff is Alynda Lee Segarra, but in many ways it’s much more than that: it’s a young woman leaving her indelible stamp on the American folk tradition. If you’re listening to her new album, ‘Small Town Heroes,’ odds are you’re part of the riff raff, and these songs are for you.

“It’s grown into this bigger idea of feeling like we really associate with the underdog,” says Segarra, who came to international attention in 2012 with ‘Look Out Mama.’ The album earned her raves from NPR and the New York Times to Mojo and Paste, along with a breakout performance at the 2013 Newport Folk Festival, which left American Songwriter “awestruck” and solidified her place at the forefront of a new generation of young musicians celebrating and reimagining American roots music. “We really feel at home with a lot of worlds of people that don’t really seem to fit together,” she continues, “and we find a way to make them all hang out with our music. Whether it’s the queer community or some freight train-riding kids or some older guys who love classic country, a lot of folks feel like mainstream culture isn’t directed at them. We’re for those people.”

Segarra, a 26-year-old of Puerto Rican descent whose slight frame belies her commanding voice, grew up in the Bronx, where she developed an early appreciation for doo-wop and Motown from the neighborhood’s longtime residents. It was downtown, though, that she first felt like she found her people, traveling to the Lower East side every Saturday for punk matinees at ABC No Rio. “Those riot grrrl shows were a place where young girls could just hang out and not have to worry about feeling weird, like they didn’t belong,” Segarra says of the inclusive atmosphere fostered by the musicians and outsider artists who populated the space. “It had such a good effect on me to go to those shows as a kid and feel like somebody in a band was looking out for me and wanted me to feel inspired and good about myself.”

The Lower East Side also introduced her to travelers, and their stories of life on the road inspired her to strike out on her own at 17, first hitching her way to the west coast, then roaming the south before ultimately settling in New Orleans. There, she fell in with a band of fellow travelers, playing washboard and singing before eventually learning to play a banjo she’d been given in North Carolina. “It wasn’t until I got to New Orleans that I realized playing music was even possible for me,” she explains. “The travelers really taught me how to play and write songs, and we’d play on the street all day to make money, which is really good practice. You have to get pretty tough to do that, and you put a lot of time into it.”

“The community I found in New Orleans was open and passionate. The young artists were really inspiring to me,” she says. “Apathy wasn’t a part of that scene. And then the year after I first visited, Katrina happened, and I went back and saw the pain and hardship that all of the people who lived there had gone through. It made we want to straighten out my life and not wander so much. The city gave had given me an amazing gift with music, and it made me want to settle there and be a part of it and help however I could.”

Many of the songs on ‘Small Town Heroes’ reflect that decision and her special reverence for the city. She bears witness to a wave of violence that struck the St. Roch neighborhood in the soulful “St. Roch Blues;” yearns for a night at BJ’s Bar in the Bywater in “Crash on the Highway;” and sings of her home in the Lower Ninth Ward on “End of the Line.” “That neighborhood and particularly the house I lived in there became the nucleus of a singer songwriter scene in New Orleans,” she explains. “‘End Of The Line’ is my love song to that whole area and crew of people.”

The scope of the album is much grander than just New Orleans, though, as Segarra mines the deep legacies and contemporizes the rich variety of musical forms of the American South for the age of Trayvon Martin and Wendy Davis. “Delia”s gone but I’m settling the score,” she sings with resolute menace on “The Body Electric,” a feminist reimagining of the traditional murder ballad form that calls on everything from Stagger Lee to Walt Whitman. She juxtaposes pure country pop with the dreams and nightmares that come with settling down with just one person in “I Know It’s Wrong (But That’s Alright),” while album opener “Blue Ridge Mountain” is an Appalachian nod to Maybelle Carter.

NPR has said that Hurray for the Riff Raff’s music “sweeps across eras and genres with grace and grit,” and that’s never been more true than on ‘Small Town Heroes.’ These songs belong to no particular time or place, but rather to all of us. These songs are for the riff raff.
Venue Information:
Merriweather Post Pavilion
10475 Little Patuxent Parkway
Columbia, Maryland, 21044
http://www.merriweathermusic.com/