Queens Of The Stone Age

I.M.P. presents

Queens Of The Stone Age

St. Vincent, Brody Dalle

Thu, July 17, 2014

5:30 pm

Merriweather Post Pavilion

Columbia, MD

$40.00 - $65.00

This event is all ages

There is an 8 ticket limit for this show per household, customer, credit card number, phone number or email address. Patrons who exceed the ticket limit will have their order cancelled automatically and without notice.

Queens Of The Stone Age
Queens Of The Stone Age
Having returned from a triumphant co-headlining Australia/New Zealand jaunt with NIN, Queens Of The Stone Age have wasted no time in teaming with director Hiro Murai (Childish Gambino, St. Vincent) for the just unveiled cinematic mini-epic for “Smooth Sailing,” the latest single from the hailed, hailed and more hailed international #1 album …Like Clockwork (Matador).

The definitely NSFW “Smooth Sailing” follows QOTSA’s Joshua Homme and cohorts on a delirious adventure that blossoms from garden variety drunken shenanigans to possibly the most nightmarishly accurate live action interpretation of a QOTSA song to date. Seriously, “Smooth Sailing” lends a new meaning to 3-D musical cinema-that is, it turns the 3 D’s into Drinking, Drugs and Death.

“Smooth Sailing” can be seen at http://youtu.be/QetvK6ldl2s

In addition to newly announced dates in Montreal, Bangor ME, Port Chester NY and Philadelphia, Queens Of The Stone Age have begun to confirm details of a South America tour for this fall, including stops in Brazil, Argentina, Colombia and Uruguay. For further information, ticketing etc., as always, go to http://qotsa.com/live.
St. Vincent
St. Vincent
It starts with the creation myth: St. Vincent, naked and alone in the wilderness, startled as the ominous rattle of a snake breaks the silence of her Eden. She realizes she's not alone in the world and breaks into a run, headed towards the uncertainty of the future. It's a lovely and appropriate metaphor to open St. Vincent's self-titled fourth album, except that it literally happened.

"It's not a metaphor at all," St. Vincent, aka Annie Clark, says of the album's lead track, "Rattlesnake." While visiting a friend's west Texas ranch, she decided to strip away her clothes and fully enjoy the solitude that city life so rarely affords. "I went walking around this great expanse of land. There was no one around so I decided to take my clothes off and immerse myself in nature. I saw holes in the path, but did not put two-and-two together until I heard the rattle and caught a glimpse of the snake."

Clark's been moving at a breakneck speed for the past two years, barely stopping to catch her breath amidst a whirlwind of recording and touring. In 2011 she released her third album, 'Strange Mercy,' called "one of the year's best" by the New York Times and "something to behold" by Pitchfork. The record cemented her status as one of her generation's most fearsome and inventive guitarists, earned her the covers of SPIN, Paper, and Under the Radar, performances everywhere from the Metropolitan Museum of Art and Fallon to Letterman and Conan, and a year-long sold-out tour of her biggest venues to date around the world. She appeared on the hit IFC series Portlandia and graced the pages of Vogue's coveted September issue. It was during this already monumentally busy time that she completed work with David Byrne on their collaborative album 'Love This Giant,' another critical smash that was dubbed "marvelous" by the New Yorker and "magical" by NPR.

"I finished the 'Strange Mercy' tour in Japan and went directly into 'Love This Giant' rehearsals and the subsequent North American tour," says Clark.

At the end of it all, Clark made it clear to everyone in her life, in no uncertain terms, that she needed two weeks to decompress and readjust to life off the road. Time without interruption, without thoughts of albums or tours or festivals or studios. "36 hours later I sent everyone an email saying, 'I'm ready to go again,'" Clark laughs. "I began writing music."

Those songs turned into her most lyrically sophisticated and musically diverse collection to date, meshing distorted, aggressive electric guitars and bold vocal and synthesizer arrangements on top of a relentless rhythm section.

"I wanted the groove to be paramount," Clark says of the album, which she arranged and demoed extensively in Austin before heading into the studio in Dallas to record. She enlisted Dap-Kings drummer Homer Steinweiss and frequent collaborator McKenzie Smith of Midlake to share drum duties, while she returned to producer John Congleton to take the sonic potential they'd only just begun to tap with 'Strange Mercy' into dramatic new territory. "I wanted to make a party record you could play at a funeral."

The result is Clark's most gripping work to date. "Bring Me Your Loves" is a frenzied freakout, but even less frantic tracks like "Severed Crossed Fingers" still deliver her trademark blend of the beautiful and surreal. At the heart of all her music, though, lie larger questions about what it means to be human and the ways in which we seek to create meaning in our lives.

"Regret" catches her at a moment of immense vulnerability, while "I Prefer Your Love" may be the purest expression of affection she's ever written. "Digital Witness" tackles identity in the era of Instagram, with Clark singing, "If I can't show it / If you can't see me / What's the point of doing anything"

"We are inundated with technology that makes us perpetual spectators," says Clark. "It's not enough to just experience life, we have to document it and show it to other people in order to validate our existence." Clark is quick to admit that she, too, at times falls victim to the impulse, which is part of what fascinates her so much with the idea. "Lyrically, I'm always so interested in how complicated people are and the notion of true ambivalence," she says. "Literally, ambi-valence. Two ways at the same time."

Such is the music on 'St. Vincent': charming and alarming, gorgeous and morbid, comforting and uncanny. Four albums into one of music's most compelling careers, Annie Clark is as "ambi-valent" as ever, and she's not slowing down any time soon.
Brody Dalle
Tinnitus, the war wound of the ageing rocker, is not normally associated with women of 35 but "two decades of cymbals" have taken their toll on Brody Dalle, the punk singer married to Josh Homme (of Queens of the Stone Age).

I tell her I enjoyed her gig. "I couldn't hear shit," she replies. To be fair, no one could: the Hoxton Square Bar and Kitchen was rather too small for this kind of music. Many came to see one of rock's most famous wives expecting Courtney Love 2.0 but what they got was less theatrical, more dead-eyed and scary. While Dalle screamed, older members of the crowd kept stepping out for air. At the front, teenage girls sang along to her latest single, "Meet the Foetus/Oh the Joy". In the video, an animated unborn baby slips out of its mother's womb at night and sets the world to rights, instigating a UN-style baby conference.

"I would love to see a conference of foetuses," she says in an iambic LA monotone, tucking into a chicken breast the morning after the gig. Her left forearm bears the name of her first child, Camille, and above it another elaborate tattoo spells "Fuck off". "Meet the Foetus" was inspired by a period of post-natal depression, "the anxieties you have about bringing your children into a world that resembles the zombie apocalypse". Dalle is a mother of two children who "mean more to me than anything else in the world". Her music is a unique brand of domestic hardcore.

She has been on the scene for years. Born in Melbourne in 1979, she had a bad start: she had a violent father (he now lives in England – "in Leeds or some shit") and later she suffered sexual abuse. She formed the all-girl punk group Sourpuss when she was 13, then took up with Tim Armstrong, the lead singer of the US rock group Rancid (sample lyric: "The Holocaust was nothing compared to my lividity!"). The marriage was fraught: "I used my band to get away from my husband." Her punk unit the Distillers had some commercial success but, she says, "I had an addiction to methamphetamine that I couldn't get away from – we all did, which is why the band imploded." When she married the desert rock titan Josh Homme (it was Dalle who first called him "the ginger Elvis"), she found stability but babies – and baby blues – halted her music career.

In 2014, the world is once again open to the idea of tough, surly female singers in Airtex shirts and Dalle's first solo album, Diploid Love (which will be released in April) is bang on time. The acts that inspired her when she was 13 ("L7, Babes in Toyland, Hole, 7 Year Bitch") were cornerstones of the riot grrrl movement, now seen by rock's reverse telescope as a key part of modern feminism, inspiring "girl power" in mainstream pop and, eventually, the balaclava-toting Russian dissidents who riffed on its name.

"I could not tell you what Pussy Riot sound like," she says, working a tea strainer. "I've read all the articles but I have not heard a note of their music. Which is probably the experience of a lot of people. I'm not very impressed with Russia, though, seriously. F*** them. No gays? They must be out of their minds. They should have had the Olympics taken off them. It is embarrassing."

Her husband, Homme, whose nexus of musical collaborations includes Eagles of Death Metal and Them Crooked Vultures (his supergroup with John Paul Jones), has not had a direct creative input on Diploid Love, though the couple have recorded together in the past. "I feel a little bit of anxiety working with him because as a musician, he's on a different level from me," she says. "With my melodies and harmonies I can compete but not with playing. I would not be able to jam with my husband. He is an accomplished badass. He is not a wanker at all. He has the sexiest, most tasteful riffs."

Dalle's second coming suggests an alternative to the popular notion that creative people lose their edge when they find domestic bliss. "When you have a kid, all this stuff from your own childhood starts to come up. It is gnarly. Once, the music and the band were the outlet: now, I'm more equipped to deal with it but I have an endless well of darkness."

Kate Mossman-New Statesman
Venue Information:
Merriweather Post Pavilion
10475 Little Patuxent Parkway
Columbia, MD, 21044
http://www.merriweathermusic.com/